Holistic Therapies in Hotels: Beyond Massage

International hotels embraced the spa, with its love affair for holistic therapies, a long time ago. You could even make a case for centuries and millennia, if you include the Roman baths of ancient times. Spa resorts in mountain hideaways have been treating people for centuries, as stated. In the twentieth century, with air travel exploding in popularity, and the middle classes getting wealthier and wealthier we saw an eruption of five star hotels in big cities. Businessmen were staying in these hotels whilst facilitating deals between their companies; and their wives needed something to do on the odd occasions they accompanied them.

The spa had beauticians and superficial treatment rooms offering superficial therapies. Concepts like wellbeing were born, dripping in aromatherapy and being massaged to within an inch of its life. Holistic therapies in hotels: Beyond massage the superficial eventually gave way to things like medical tourism and much more invasive treatments. Boob jobs and facelifts could be done in the luxury and comfort of a five star hotel or resort. Walk in flat chested and/or ugly and walk out reborn, Botoxed and bandaged but soon to be looking like a million bucks.

Holistic Therapies in Hotels: Beyond Massage

Of course, there have been other less extreme treatments like low level laser therapy for feet conditions like plantar fasciitis. A new effective treatment for a debilitating problem. Osteopathy has made great strides in its treatment of this condition and many other feet and lower leg problems. Holistic therapies in hotels: Beyond massage has seen a deepening of the kind of treatments now offered by these establishments. The froth and bubbles of wellbeing have given way to more powerful and substantial therapies. Technology has joined together with many traditional healing modalities to deliver twenty first century treatments for better health.

Everything evolves, or it withers and dies, and holistic therapies are not immune to this reality. Taking inspiration from the ancient past, many modalities have adapted to a high tech age and sought to combine the best of both of these worlds, hopefully. It is a balancing act in some cases, where the therapy seeks to improve its efficacy without losing its soul. There have been fierce battles between proponents of change and adherents to tradition. Reiki practitioners, re-birthers, and holistic therapists of all persuasions have faced these upheavals, as they have sought to continue their healing journeys. Alternative therapies, complementary medicine, new-age healers; the names change but the essential nature of the work remains the same.